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Homies

Save The Pangolin black
₹1,299 ₹999 -23%

Our products are made in our own factories where we offer our employees better wages and working conditions while respecting our evironment. No child labour was used in the making of this product.

This product is cruelty-free - and does not contain any animal products or by-products. Supporter of the wildlife conservation network.

This footwear is made using sustainably sourced 100% cotton that does not use any harmful chemicals.

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If you want to feel like a well-cared for baby in your own home, then these soft and snuggly homies are the perfect companion. Made partially from upcycled materials with a cushy midsole it is sure to keep your feet happy company.

The inspiration for this colour comes from the lilac patch on the chest of the Lilac-breasted Roller. Did you know: The lilac-breasted roller resides throughout eastern and southern Africa and the southern region of the Arabian Peninsula. Their agile flying abilities, unusual hunting, and place in African folklore are just as intriguing.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the brilliant violet colour of the sea snail. Did you know: The scientific name of the Violet Sea snail is Janthina Janthina, and they're found worldwide in the warm waters of tropical and temperate seas, floating at the surface.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Mantis. Mantises are distributed worldwide in temperate and tropical habitats. Did you know: They have triangular heads with bulging eyes supported on flexible necks.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the vibrant blue Morpho. Blue Morpho butterflies are one of the most emblematic and favourite of all Amazon species. They have a characteristic vivid blue colour and shiny wings that reflect the light, making them easy to spot amidst the jungle canopy.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the popular pet, Hamsters. They are rodents belonging to the subfamily Cricetinae, which contains 19 species classified in seven genera.

The inspiration for the colour comes from an Impala, a medium-sized antelope found in eastern and southern Africa. A slender, agile creature, the Impala can clear formidable obstacles and run at speeds faster than 60km/h.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the violet-backed starling, also known as the plum-coloured starling or amethyst starling. They will nest in spaces such as tree holes high above the ground, holes in river shorelines, even in old cavity fence posts, covering the nests with dung, leaves and other plant stuff.

The inspiration for the colour comes from Kingfishers. They are a family of small to medium-sized, brightly coloured birds in the order of Coraciiformes. They have a cosmopolitan distribution, with most species found in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Kingfishers eat mainly fish, chiefly minnows and sticklebacks, but they also take aquatic insects, freshwater shrimps and tadpoles.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the famous Indian peacock from the Indian subcontinent. The Indian peacock, Pavo cristatus, the National Bird of India, is a colourful, swan-sized bird with a fan-shaped crest of feathers, a white patch under the eye and a long, slender neck.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the royal blue body of the Blue tang. Did you know: The blue tang has a yellow tail and a black "palette" design. This fish is relatively flat, like a pancake, with a circular body shape, a pointed snout-like nose, and minor scales. The blue tang has nine dorsal spines, 26-28 dorsal soft rays, three anal spines, and 24-26 anal soft yellow rays.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Green tree pythons. They have diamond-shaped heads with irregular scales and are named for their vibrant green colour. They have white or yellow vertebral stripes, and many also have yellow, green or blue spots. The species is native to New Guinea, some islands in Indonesia, and the Cape York Peninsula in Australia.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the most common Geckos. They are small, primarily carnivorous lizards found on every continent except Antarctica.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Iguana, a genus of herbivorous lizards that are native to tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Iguanas need UV light to make vitamin D in their skin, enabling them to absorb calcium from their food.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Oxybelis. They are a genus of colubrid snakes endemic to the Americas, commonly known as vine snakes. The green vine snake is mildly venomous. Their bite is not fatal for humans. It usually induces slight numbness or a tingling sensation, but it may occasionally trigger a severe allergic reaction.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the scarlet ibis. It inhabits tropical South America and part of the Caribbean. The scarlet ibis is the national bird of Trinidad and Tobago.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Red velvet mite also called as Trombidiidae. True velvet mites, or rain bugs, are small arachnids found in plant litter and are known for their bright red color. The color of the red velvet mite is a kind of warning for their predators, in order to let them know that these mites can be really nasty.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the red avadavat, also known as red munia or strawberry finch. This sparrow-sized bird belongs to the Estrildidae family. It is found in the open fields and grasslands of tropical Asia and is famous as a caged bird due to the colourful plumage of the males in their breeding season.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the red panda, a carnivoran native to the eastern Himalayas and southwestern China. Also known as the lesser panda, red bear-cat and red cat-bear, the first red panda fossil was found a little bit further afield than that—in the United Kingdom.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the yellow bumblebee. It is any of over 250 species in the genus Bombus, part of Apidae, one of the bee families. Bumblebees are large, fuzzy insects with short, stubby wings. They are larger than honeybees, but they don't produce as much honey. However, they are essential pollinators. Without them, food wouldn't grow.

The inspiration for the colour comes from Gosling, a specialised term for a young baby goose, typically still covered with soft, fluffy down feathers and unable to fly.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the famous freshwater goldfish from the family Cyprinidae. It is commonly kept as a pet in indoor aquariums and is one of the most popular aquarium fish. But, did you know: With the proper care, goldfish can live for decades.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the yellow tang, a saltwater fish species of the family Acanthuridae. It is one of the most popular marine aquarium fish. It is bright yellow and lives in reefs.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Panther. In 1788, the first black Panther was brought from Bengal to the UK and kept in The Tower of London. Black Leopards are more common in Travancore and the hills of Southern India.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the blue whale, a marine mammal, reaching a maximum confirmed length of 29.9 metres and weighing up to 199 tonnes. It is the largest animal known to have ever existed.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the adorable koala. It is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. Koalas survive on a diet of eucalyptus leaves and can eat up to a kilogram a day.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Chinchillas. They are either of two species of crepuscular rodents of the parvorder Caviomorpha. They are native to the Andes mountains in South America. Wild chinchillas are endangered, primarily due to hunting pressure from humans who prize their pelts. Over 100 chinchillas are required to make just one coat.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the stag, one of the largest deer species. A male red deer is called a stag or hart, and a female is called a hind. The red deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Anatolia, Iran, and western Asia. They have an impressive night vision, which is essential during their feeding time and escape from predators.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the common dragonfly. Large, multifaceted eyes characterise adult dragonflies, two pairs of strong, transparent wings, sometimes with coloured patches, and an elongated body.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the quirky Flamingos. These species are distributed throughout the Americas, including the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and Europe. A flamingo's nest looks like a mini mud volcano, with room for one large egg.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the axolotl. It is a paedomorphic salamander related to the tiger salamander. Axolotls are carnivorous — they eat everything from fish and worms to insects and crustaceans. However, they aren't incredibly picky and will eat meat that is dead or alive.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Sea turtles, sometimes called marine turtles. Green sea turtles have a more plant-based diet and eat seagrass. By keeping seagrass short, they prevent it from getting tall and harming other marine creatures.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Cephalota, a small, low growing, herbaceous species. Evergreen leaves appear from underground rhizomes, are simple with an entire leaf blade, and lie close to the ground. The insectivorous leaves are small and have the appearance of moccasins, forming the 'pitcher' of the common name.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Chameleons or chamaeleons that are a distinctive and highly specialized clade of Old World lizards These species come in a range of colours, and many species have the ability to change colour. Chameleons can shoot out their tongues at alarming speeds, use their tails as extra limbs, and even see in two different directions at once.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the stoat or short-tailed weasel, also known as the Eurasian ermine. It is a mustelid native to Eurasia and the northern portions of North America. Ermine has a small, triangular head, rounded ears, elongated whiskers, sleek body, short legs and long tail. Ermine has sharp claws that facilitate digging and climbing on the trees and is a nocturnal creature.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the mountain lion, also called the cougar. Native to the Americas, its range spans from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes in South America and is the most widespread of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere. They are the fourth largest cats in the world.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the snowy owl, also known as the polar owl, the white owl and the Arctic owl is a large, white owl of the true owl family. Snowy owls are native to the Arctic regions of both North America and the Palearctic, mainly breeding on the tundra. Bristles on their beaks help them sense nearby objects.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the ghost snake that is part of a common group of snakes, or cat-eyed snakes, named for their vertical pupils, often found among snakes that are active in the evening or night.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Lemurs that are wet-nosed primates of the superfamily Lemuroidea, divided into eight families. They are native only to the island of Madagascar. The story of lemurs begins over 70 million years ago, long before humans.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Greyhound, a breed of dog bred for coursing game and greyhound racing. Since the rise in large-scale adoption of retired racing Greyhounds, the species has seen a resurgence in popularity as a family pet.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Rupicola (cock-of-the-rock), which are large cotingid birds native to South America. Its diet consists mainly of fruit and insects, as well as tiny frogs and reptiles.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the pink robin, a small passerine bird native to southeastern Australia. Its natural habitats are the cool temperate forests of far southeastern Australia. Pink robins are carnivores. They feed on insects such as spiders, caterpillars, and beetles. However, they prefer to catch insects roaming on the ground among the leaves rather than catching their prey mid-air.

The inspiration for the colour comes from a camel, an even-toed ungulate in the genus Camelus that bears distinctive fatty deposits known as "humps" on its back. They are primarily domesticated and, as livestock, provide food and textiles. But, did you know, Camels can completely shut their nostrils during sandstorms?

The inspiration for the colour comes from the red fody, also known as the Madagascar fody in Madagascar and introduced to various other islands in the Indian Ocean. The Madagascar Fody is about 5 inches in length and weighs 14-19 grams. The male of the species is bright red with black markings around each eye. Its wings and tail are olive-brown. The female fody's upper body is olive-brown, and its underbody is greyish-brown.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Lampyridae, commonly known as the firefly. They are a family of insects in the beetle order Coleoptera with more than 2,000 described species. They are soft-bodied beetles, commonly called glowworms or lightning bugs, for their conspicuous use of bioluminescence during twilight to attract mates or prey.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the blue jay, a passerine bird in the family Corvidae, native to eastern North America. It lives in most of the eastern and central United States; some eastern populations may be migratory. Blue Jays can make various sounds, and it is common to hear them mimicking hawks, especially the Red-shouldered Hawk. Ornithologists suggest they do this for one of two reasons, or perhaps both. The first theory is the mimicry serves as a warning to other jays about any lurking hawks. The second is that jays are trying to fool other species into thinking there are hawks nearby.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Cuban Martin, which breeds on Caribbean islands from Jamaica east to Tobago. The adult male is entirely glossy purple-blue and is inseparable in the field from male Purple Martins.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the common wild animal , a wolf, also known as the gray wolf or grey wolf, is a large canine native to Eurasia and North America. Wolves are the largest members of the dog family. Wolves can roam large and long distances, sometimes up to 12 miles (20 kilometers) in a single day. Wolves prefer to eat large animals like deer, elk, and moose.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Bobtail squid, a group of cephalopods closely related to cuttlefish. Bobtail squid tend to have a rounder mantle than cuttlefish and have no cuttlebone. Instead, they have eight suckered arms and two tentacles and are generally relatively small.

The inspiration for this colour comes from the ladybird. The ladybird became immortalised in the popular children's nursery rhyme Ladybird. Ladybird: ladybird, ladybird, fly away home, your house is on fire, and your children are gone. All except one, and that's little Anne, for she has crept under the warming pan.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Sphynx cat, or simply Sphynx. The breed of cat is known for its lack of fur. Hairlessness in cats is a naturally occurring genetic mutation, and the Sphynx was developed through selective breeding of these animals, starting in the 1960s.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the red velvet mite, also called Trombidiidae. Velvet mites, or rain bugs, are tiny arachnids found in plant litter and are known for their bright red colour. The colour of the red velvet mite is a kind of warning for their predators to let them know that these mites can be nasty.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the scarlet ibis, It inhabits tropical South America and part of the Caribbean. The scarlet ibis is the national bird of Trinidad and Tobago.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Arctic fox, also known as the white fox, polar fox, or snow fox, a small fox native to the Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere and shared throughout the Arctic tundra biome. Arctic fox fur changes seasonally.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Red Sea Star. It's not just the cherry shrimp you have to watch out for because the red sea star can also give it a run for its money. This lonely living red Starfish has various shades of reds in its body and often has patterns of animal colour consisting of red and black.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Spanish shawl, a sea slug. Typically, they are found on the west coast of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Galapagos Islands. The reason for their colors is two-fold. While the orange gills help them to camouflage while eating prey, the bright purple tells predators to stay away.

The inspiration for the colour comes from Camels. Camels are working animals especially suited to their desert habitat and are a vital means of transport for passengers and cargo. There are three surviving species of camel. The one-humped dromedary and the two-humped Bactrian camel make up most of the world's camel population. The Wild Bactrian camel is a separate species and is now critically endangered.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the racoon. The racoon is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur, which insulates it against cold weather. Three of the raccoon's most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws, its facial mask, and its ringed tail, which are themes in the mythologies of the indigenous peoples of the Americas relating to the animal.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Kodiak Bear. Kodiak bears are a unique subspecies of the brown or grizzly bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi). They live exclusively on the islands in the Kodiak Archipelago and have been isolated from other bears for about 12,000 years.

The inspiration for the colour comes from the Arctic fox, also known as the white fox, polar fox, or snow fox, is a small fox native to the Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere and common throughout the Arctic tundra biome.Arctic fox fur changes seasonally.

These slippers are dyed using dyes that are non-toxic and free from harmful chemicals.

Reducing our environmental impact has been a top priority since day one. But now, we’re taking things further. For every hat sold we give back an equivalent amount of the carbon offset cost to wildlife conservation projects around the world. We also make a concerted effort to reduce our environmental impact which directly affects the wildlife habitat. Supporter of the wildlife conservation network.

Vegan & Cruelty free.

These Homies will be the perfect addition to your next cleaning session. Place them in a delicates bag and toss them into the washing machine. Wash on cold with your favorite mild detergent! Air dry your Homies post so you can enjoy cozy comfort all day long.

Please note that there can be slight variations in the coloration of our products.

We produce your caps post order, this results in significantly reducing the wastage associated with overruns. Our caps ship within 7 working days from the date of the order. All orders above Rs 2500 ship free.

Returns You can return your purchase goods within 7 days from its receipt. Please make sure all the labels are intact and there aren't any visible stains or damage to the garment.

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Fellow Homie

Your friendly packaging alternative that keeps both you and our biodiversity happy.

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I am a zero waste alternative that has been made using upcycled materials to help keep your Homies company when they are not in use.

(Please Note that the colours of the packiging will vary as they have been made using whatever upcycled materials are available at the time.)

Cotton 2.0

What makes our cotton so exceptional? The answer is simple: longer strands mean higher quality. We exclusively use 100% extra long staple (EUS) varieties for all of your needs, which provide you with the best possible experience both now and in years to come!

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Cotton 2.0

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